HIRING CHALLENGES FOR THE SMALL BUISNESS OWNER (PART IV OF IV)

SOME COMMON MISTAKES (CON’T)

Lacking a Solid Onboarding Program

  • Training alone is not sufficient to ensure a candidate’s success. You must have a clearly defined onboarding program as well. Hiring managers may sometimes feel that their job is done once a new employee is hired and starts his or her new job. However, an orientation and training program to help them settle into their new positions is very important.
  • Giving new hires a head start can have a direct, positive impact on employee satisfaction – and your bottom line. Outlining specific duties and clarifying when and if miscellaneous duties may occur, will make employees feel engaged. Then, they are more likely to be productive and successful in their roles. Employees who are coached at the beginning stages of a new role will contribute more to the team and reach their peak potential sooner.
  • Developing this process will help new employees get up to speed faster, lessen miscommunications, and help them understand their strengths and limitations. Also, they will learn how to adapt their work styles to fit in with new team members and managers.
  • Making the right hiring decision always begins by having a well-developed process. By avoiding the key hiring mistakes outlined above, you can better inform your hiring decisions and hire right the first time. Small companies that find the right candidates, see the specific behaviors and contributions necessary to deliver results. Improve your hiring practice today and you can build a productive, effective team for your organization.
  • Source: https://www.calipercorp.com/10-common-hiring-mistakes/

    HIRING CHALLENGES FOR THE SMALL BUSINESS OWNER (PART III OF IV)

    SOME COMMON MISTAKES (CON’T)

    Not Having a Structured Hiring Process

  • Filling open positions can be a daunting and time-consuming task. Not all small businesses have the resources for this, so it’s important to have a structured and standardized hiring process in place. You must set a hiring timeline and implement a uniform process for interviewing candidates.
  • After having a hard-learned experience recently, Akey Manufacturing created a structured hiring process by utilizing sources from our Health Insurance Provider, Retirement Services Representative and Online Research. Now we can ensure that each individual is completing the same steps and providing the same information each time. This will provide clarity to our decision-making process and ensure that we avoid some of the pitfalls listed previously.
  • A bad hire wastes time and resources, so it’s important to make certain that your company hires right the first time. Having a structured hiring process in place will ensure that you hire the right people for the right job the first time around.
  • Unfortunately, in today’s hiring market, there are those candidates who find new and creative ways to take advantage of their employers. Unpaid internships, illegal background checks, pregnancy and health-related employment discrimination continue to be the top trending employment practices litigation cases, according to industry experts. But these are not the only ways that employees can cost you. Even when you have a structured hiring process, make sure you observe your employees behaviors. You may be missing some red flags if you are not diligent.
  • One of the most critical mistakes a company can make is failing to define its hiring policies before beginning an employee search. An unclear policy can confuse the hiring managers and candidates at best, or invite legal troubles at worst. Employers should all have an employee handbook and a hiring policy in place. This will help identify issues to avoid and serve as a legal shield to potential liability in the future.
  • Sources:
    http://www.businessnewsdaily.com/5827-employer-hiring-mistakes.html#sthash.OJnkayk8.dpuf
    https://www.calipercorp.com/10-common-hiring-mistakes/
    http://www.insurancejournal.com/magazines/features/2015/01/12/353253.htm

    Challenges We Face As Small Business Owners (Con’t)

    HIRING CHALLENGES FOR THE SMALL BUSINESS OWNER (PART II OF IV)

    SOME COMMON MISTAKES (CON’T)

    Not thoroughly vetting candidates before hiring

    A candidate may have an impressive résumé, but how do you know he or she will be the right fit? Conducting background checks and calling previous employers for references is common practice.  But, in many companies, reference checks are entirely inadequate. Human Resources usually conducts them, using a carefully orchestrated, one-sided protocol. Yes, there are legal issues, and these must be addressed. But the hiring manager or supervisor should conduct these checks.  They will be working with the employee and know what is to be expected of them.

    A reference call from one manager to another can be very different from a call from an HR representative. Managers will delve into more detail, and have both the expertise and the prerogative to pursue lines of questioning that HR lacks. Also, peers are more likely to be open and blunt with one another.

    There’s one critical question at the end of the reference call that comes across as much more profound when the hiring manager asks it: “If you could have John work on your team again, would you hire him?” Of course the answer matters, but it’s the hesitation or the enthusiasm of the respondent that’s critical. Manager to manager, this one question can reveal more than any other kind of reference check.

    When hiring, don’t only consider the importance of reference checking. Involve the people who will work with the new hire.

     

    Source:

    http://www.businessnewsdaily.com/5827-employer-hiring-mistakes.html#sthash.OJnkayk8.dpuf

    Challenges We Face As Small Business Owners

    Fabricator

    HIRING CHALLENGES FOR THE SMALL BUSINESS OWNER (PART I OF IV)

    Hiring new employees means your business is thriving and that is a good thing. But, hiring is not easy.  In fact, it is one of the many challenges we face as a small business.  The wrong choice can cost you, on average, $20,000 per employee; and that number doesn’t even reflect the potential damage to your company’s reputation and credibility.  Not to mention destroying employee morale.  Make the selection wisely to continue to pursue business growth while providing a positive work experience for the entire team.

    SOME COMMON MISTAKES

    Hiring “what comes along”

    The traditional recruiting and hiring process is based on a faulty selection model. When you run traditional classified ads or hold job fairs, you create what’s referred to in the research world as “selection bias”. This process biases the outcome of your search.  You get to hire only the people who come along, narrowing your selection pool immensely.  Other options to cast a wider net, may include online job boards, or LinkedIn.  These can be fantastic ways to find people.  Utilize your website too.  Ask around to your contacts in industry groups and the local chamber of commerce.  Consider whether it might be faster and easier to hire a recruiter to find good candidates.  These companies have the resources to “vet” the candidate thoroughly.

    Thinking Experience Always Counts

    What if twelve years of experience is really just one year of bad experience warmed over a dozen times? Consider that effective hiring has less to do with experience than with that candidate’s potential.

    Depending on the experience a resume indicates, chances are you will still likely hire someone who is not ideally and inherently suited for the position. Surveys show these grim statistics: most people are not impassioned about what they are doing on the job. This is not surprising.  If they don’t love what they do they are not motivated. Why? Because the role they are in doesn’t allow them to play to their strengths.

     

    Sources:

    http://www.asktheheadhunter.com/hatenmistakes1.html

    http://smallbiztrends.com/2015/09/hiring-mistakes.html

    https://www.calipercorp.com/10-common-hiring-mistakes/

     

    USS New York LPD-21

    USS NEW YORK (LPD-21)

     

    Shortly after 9/11, George E Pataki, Governor of New York, wrote a letter to the Secretary of the Navy, Gordon R England requesting that they bestow the name “New York” on a surface warship involved in the War on Terrorism in honor of the victims of the September 11th attacks.

     

    Northrop Grumman Ship Systems of New Orleans Louisiana was awarded the contract to build the “New York” (USS New York LPD-21) in 2003.

     

    7.5 short tons (6.8 t) of the steel used in the ship’s construction came from the rubble of the World Trade Center; this represents less than one thousandth of the total weight of the ship.  The steel was melted down at Amite Foundry and Machine in Amite, Louisiana, to cast the ship’s bow section.  (In metalworking, casting involves pouring liquid metal into a mold which contains a hollow cavity of the desired shape, and then allowing it to cool and solidify).   It was poured into the molds on September 9, 2003, with 7 short tons (6.4 t) cast to form the ship’s “stem bar”—part of the ship’s bow. The shipyard workers reportedly treated it with “reverence usually accorded to religious relics,” gently touching it as they walked by. When Hurricane Katrina hit in August 2005, 1,200 shipyard workers opted to keep on working and one worker delayed his retirement after 40 years of working to be part of the project.

     

    The USS New York LPD-21 was christened at Northrop Grumman’s Avondale, Louisiana Shipyard on March 1, 2008.

    USS New York.tiff

     

    • Seven rays of sunlight signify the crown atop the Statue of Liberty and the seven seas.
    • Central focus placed on the Twin Towers and the bow of the ship, forged from TwinTowers steel.
    • Breastplate of the phoenix bears the colors of first responders from the New York Police Department, New York Fire Department, and Port Authority of New York and New Jersey.
    • Blood drops represent the fallen.
    • Three stars for those earned by the battleship USS NEW YORK (BB34) in World War II at Iwo Jima, Okinawa and North Africa.

     

    Whitewater Armory Railing-Then & Now

    Working in conjunction with RR Walton Company, Ltd., Akey fabricated new railings for the Old Armory in Whitewater, WI.

    “The Whitewater National Guard Armory was built in 1940 by a WPA Labor Group. Total cost for construction was $30,000. It served as the National Guard Armory until 1992 when the new National Guard Armory was built in the Whitewater Business Park. During WWII, when driving was restricted, the Chamber of Commerce ran dances here that were a popular recreational activity. The building was also leased out three months of the year for roller skating.” 

    http://www.whitewater-wi.gov/images/stories/cable_television/WalkingTourBooklet2004.pdf

    Today, the Old Armory is an institution with many useful purposes. It serves as a Community Center; Dance Studio; Gym; Food Pantry; & Voting Poll.

    Akey Manufacturing is proud to be a part of this project. We salute all the volunteers and staff who devote their time and effort supporting the Whitewater community.

    THEN

    Exterior of Armory Before
    Armory B4(1)
    Armory B4(2)

    NOW

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    Exterior of Whitewater Armory Before New Railing
    Exterior of Whitewater Armory Before New Railing
    Exterior of Whitewater Armory Before New Railing
    New Railing fabricated by Akey Manufacturing
    New Railing fabricated by Akey Manufacturing
    New Railing fabricated by Akey Manufacturing
    New Railing fabricated by Akey Manufacturing
    New Railing fabricated by Akey Manufacturing

    COMPANY PICNIC 2015

    COMPANY PICNIC AND EMPLOYEE APPRECIATION 2015

     

    The benefits of hosting a company picnic go beyond the fun you have that day.  Companies should consider Employee Appreciation events like a birthday, Valentine’s Day, or Mother’s or Father’s Day. The sentiments we share and the way we make others feel on those days is how we should act every day. Companies can show appreciation to their employees all year long. The energy and happier-than-usual mood that bringing in breakfast or hosting an awards ceremony creates in an office will certainly be palpable, yet this can be done throughout the year.  Employee Appreciation is a big opportunity to engage and keep your employees happy and productive.

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    UW Whitewater Railing Project

    FUNDRAISER GOLF OUTING

    Congratulations to our foursome (Mark Koch, Eric Rooney, Rick Lang, and Josh Rosburg) who played a great round of golf for a great cause July 11th for the Friends of GOAL Golf Scramble fundraiser for the Orfordville Library! Eric was our “Boat on the Pond” winner and got the ball INSIDE the boat! What a shot! Last year no one even hit the boat! There were raffles and a silent auction that we all enjoyed as well. A big thank you to our other attendees: Jerry Hexom, Beth Lang, Katie Rosburg and Kasey Rosburg for coming out and joining Brad and I in supporting this event!

    Brad & Jodi
    Katie & Eric with Cheese Prize
    Eric & His Packer Prize
    Rick & Beth
    Kacey & Josh(2)
    Eric & His Boat on the Pond Prize(2)
    Katie, Eric & Ron
    Jerry & Prizes
    Brad & Mark(2)

    ONE OF OUR LATEST PROJECTS-COOLING TOWER STAND